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Best Places in Perth to see the Wildflowers in Full Bloom

Home to some of the country’s best weather in September and October, spring in Perth also signals the return of more than 8,000 species of wildflower to the region for another season. While the entire state is renowned for offering some of the world’s most magnificent displays of flora, there are plenty of top places to see within easy reach of the capital city.

Want to experience then untamed wilderness of Western Australia for yourself? Pick up a Perth car hire and discover our top spots to see the last of the season’s buds in full bloom – all within 75 kilometres of the city’s centre.

 

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Kings Park

Start your journey at Perth’s iconic Kings Park – a 400-acre botanic garden teeming with native flowers and lush greenery. A hive of activity in September when the dramatic display of wildflowers and annual Kings Park Festival welcome throngs of locals and visitors alike, this inner-city oasis is even more impressive in October when the crowds subside. Experience uninterrupted views of Banksias, Woolly Wattles and Pear-fruited Mallees against a panoramic backdrop of Perth’s cityscape before setting your sights on the Darling Ranges – an undulating hillside where even more wildflowers await.

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Walyunga National Park

Set amidst the meadows of Perth’s Swan Valley and the rolling hills of the Darling Ranges, it’s hard to believe this expansive national park is a mere 37 kilometres north-east of the CBD. A rugged wilderness as well known for its rust-coloured mountains as it is for its impressive collection of flora and fauna, Walyunga National Park’s spectrum of colours is unparalleled by any other park in the region, with broad strokes covering nearly every acre of the reserve.

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Avon Valley National Park

An hour further afield from Walyunga, Avon Valley National Park is home to the same hues of its southerly neighbour with an aerial twist. While an intricate network of trails is available for walkers, runners and bikers alike, this conservation area’s biggest drawcard is its air balloon tours, which depart regularly throughout the day. Float far above the flower-filled meadows of the Swan Valley before making your way back to ground level for an up close encounter with some of Western Australia’s rarest floral varieties.

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John Forrest National Park

An essential stop on the southbound journey back towards the city, this historic hinterland proudly dons the title of Western Australia’s oldest national park. A credit to its age, this long-protected nature reserve boasts one of the most pristine displays of native bushland in all of Australia. An easy day trip just 24 kilometres east of Perth, John Forrest National Park’s many walking tracks are conveniently paired with a stunning scenic drive, where nearly all of the park’s 500 wildflower species can be seen from the comfort of your car.

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Freemantle Markets

Back in the city, the famous Freemantle Markets offer an entirely different take on the season with their annual Wildflower Display – an innovative, upside-down art installation showcasing one of the region’s most-celebrated blossoms, the Everlasting. Running from the September 4 to November 30, this vibrant exhibition brings another dimension to the already bustling marketplace with a spectacular 140-square metre canopy of colour. Best of all, the dried bouquets are available for sale at the festival’s end, which means you can enjoy Western Australia’s wildflowers long after your adventure comes to an end.

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See the last of the spring colours before they disappear for another year. Grab a car hire in Perth and begin your flower-filled journey today.

All images licensed under CC BY 2.0, courtesy of Lakshmi Sawitri.

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